HISTORIC EIGHT DOCUMENTS BY CHARU MAJUMDAR

Proletarians of all countries, unite!
There is one goal, the conquest of power!

HISTORIC EIGHT DOCUMENTS BY CHAIRMAN CHARU MAJUMDAR

28.01.1965. OUR TASKS IN THE PRESENT SITUATION

1965. MAKE THE PEOPLE’S DEMOCRATIC REVOLUTION SUCCESSFUL BY FIGHTING AGAINST REVISIONISM

09.04.1965. WHAT IS THE SOURCE OF THE SPONTANEOUS REVOLUTIONARY OUTBURST IN INDIA?

1965. CARRY ON THE STRUGGLE AGAINST MODERN REVISIONISM

1965. WHAT POSSIBILITY THE YEAR 1965 IS INDICATING?

1966. TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD UP ARMED PARTISAN STRUGGLE BY FIGHTING AGAINST REVISIONISM

08.12.1966. THE MAIN TASK TODAY IS THE STRUGGLE TO BUILD UP THE TRUE REVOLUTIONARY PARTY THROUGH UNCOMPROMISING STRUGGLE AGAINST REVISIONISM

April 1967. CARRY FORWARD THE PEASANT STRUGGLE BY FIGHTING REVISIONISM

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The people’s war in India today.

Profile of a leader

Charu Mazumdar, or more popularly known as CM, was born in a Zamindari family of Siliguri in 1918. As a school student he was influenced by the petty-bourgeois national revolutionaries and became a member of the All Bengal Students Association, affiliated to the Anusilan group. His father, a lawyer, was an active Congress freedom fighter and his mother was progressive for her times. In 1937-38 he dropped out of college and became a Congress worker organising bidi workers and others. After a few years he quit the Congress and joined the CPI, working in the peasant front. Primarily he worked amongst the Jalpaiguri peasantry and became a popular leader amongst them. When a warrant was issued for his arrest he went underground. At the outbreak of World War II the party was banned and he did secret organisational work amongst the peasantry and became a member of the CPI Jalpaiguri district committee in 1942. During the great famine of 1943, he organised the seizure of crops in Jalpaiguri. In 1946 he participated in the Tebhaga movement and organised militant struggles of the peasants in North Bengal. This movement had a profound impact on him and shaped his vision on armed peasantry developing a revolutionary movement. Later he worked amongst the tea garden workers of Darjeeling district.

In 1948 the CPI was banned and he spent the next three years in jail. In January 1954 he married Lila Mazumdar Sengupta, a CPI cardholder from Jalpaiguri. They shifted to Siliguri, which remained the centre of his activity. His ailing father and unmarried sister lived there under severe financial constraints having lost their ancestral property. As the peasant movement receded he spent his efforts organising tea garden workers, rickshaw pullers, etc. After the Palghat Congress in 1956 his ideological differences with the party widened. Severe financial constraints added to his depressing conditions. But, the Great Debate, in the international communist movement lifted his spirits. During the Indo-China war he was again put in jail. Though he joined the CPI (M) in the split, he found the leadership dodging the key ideological questions. In 1964-65 he was sick and devoted time to studying and writing about communism and Mao’s thought. It was here that he developed his ideas which were recorded in his writings and speeches of 1965-67 – subsequently known as the ‘Historic Eight Documents’ – which formed the political-ideological basis for the emergence of the Naxalite movement.

Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist) People’s War: “30 Years of Naxalbari”, 1997. Vanguard Publications.